Health Visitors

Health visitors are qualified nurses with a Public Health qualification who specialise in child and family health and wellbeing by delivering The Healthy Child Programme.

Health Visitors can be contacted by telephone during office hours on 01962 831088, and are available at Child Health Clinics.

More information about the Health Visitor service found on the website and details about the child health clinics can be found on this link

Health Visitors work in partnership with you in the community to promote healthy lifestyle choices and health and well-being to all children from late pregnancy until school entry.

Health visitors offer every family five key contacts to offer support with transition to parenthood and maternal mental health, breastfeeding, healthy eating, managing minor ailments, child development, and school readiness.

Further specific expert support and advice can also be offered with a range of subjects such as parenting, sleep, behaviour, healthy eating, toileting, introducing solid foods.

The first appointment with your Health visitor will be around your 28th week of pregnancy and then between 10 and 14 days after your baby is born. A plan for further support will be agreed at these visits in line with The Healthy Child Programme depending on you and your family's needs.

Health Visitors work in partnership with Children's Centres who offer activities and courses for the under 5s. Details can be found on their website

Immunisations

We run a full range of childhood (pre-school) immunisations. You should receive an appointment for your child to attend from the surgery.

Clinic Time: Every TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY 10:40- 12:30 pm

If it is difficult to attend the set clinics the nurses may be able to administer immunisations at weekday clinics.

Please check the following points before bringing your child to the surgery. There has been a lot of bad publicity in the newspapers about immunisation in children but remember, your child is at greater risk from contracting the disease than he or she is from suffering a reaction to immunisation.

  1. Is your child suffering from any feverish illness? Don't worry about a runny nose without a fever.
  2. Does the child, their parent, brother or sister suffer from epilepsy? Epilepsy in more distant relatives is not considered a problem.
  3. Is your child taking steroid treatment?
  4. Does your child suffer from any disease affecting his or her immune system?
  5. Does your child suffer from a severe reaction to eggs?
  6. Has your child suffered from a reaction to any previous immunisation injection?

If the answer to any of the questions above is yes, then tell your doctor.

For more information go to www.immunisation.nhs.uk

When should a child be immunised?

For more information about routine child immunisations visit the NHS CHOICES website or contact the surgery and arrange to speak to the practice nurse.

We follow the UK national vaccination schedule - to see it.

At two months old
  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib)
  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
  • Rotavirus
At three months old
  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib)
  • Meningitis C (meningococcal group C) (MenC)
  • Rotavirus
At four months old
  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib)
  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
Between 12 - 13 months old
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and meningitis C (Hib/MenC) - booster dose
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles) (MMR)
  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
Two, Three and Four years old
  • Influenza -nasal spray (Seasonal)
Three years four months or soon after
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough) and polio (dTaP/IPV or DTaP/IPV)
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles) (MMR)
Girls aged 12 to 13 years old
  • HPV - Cervical cancer
Around 14 years old
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and polio (Td/IPV)
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles) (MMR)